Turn Your Team Into a Band Series

Turn Your Team into a Band Series

Introduction
Develop a Solid Sense of Time, Part 1
Develop a Solid Sense of Time, Part 2
Develop a Solid Sense of Time, Part 3

11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 1
11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 2
11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 3
11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 4
11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 5
11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 6
11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 7
11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 8

a bandIntroduction - Creating a Great Band
(or Getting Beyond Being Musical Roommates)

Musically speaking, a disturbing number of worship teams don’t function as a band. I’m not even sure what term to use for this kind of musical hodgepodge, but here’s the definition:

“Seven people on the same stage all playing the same song, in the same key at (almost) the same time.” [read more]

 

metronomeDevelop a Solid Sense of Time, Part 1:
Start Playing With a Click

A WorshipMinistry.com article

If your team hasn’t done this before, it will be painful. So painful, you might find yourself on the receiving end of coup d’etat or the southern side of a Baptist dog-pile. So let me give you some steps to ease your team into the icy waters of a click...[read all]

 

 

Develop a Solid Sense of Time, Part 2:
Time Management Issues...

A WorshipMinistry.com article

In part one, we talked about the need for exposing our team to the objective, non-partial, undistorted musical mirror known as a metronome. Those eight steps of metronome introduction could easily take you several months. But don’t let that stop you from considering these issues as you’re working towards a solid sense of timing. [read all]

 

Develop a Solid Sense of Time, Part 3
Time Management Issues, Continued...

A WorshipMinistry.com article

In this continuation of part two, we discuss how to deal with singers who drag. (Not dress in drag - that's another issue to deal with on a different level.) We also look at how we confuse louder with faster and use an overcharged tempo to compensate for a sparse band. And we can't forget to pick on the biggest culprits of tempo - the keyboard player and the acoustic guitarist. [Read the article at WorshipMinistry.com] 

11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 1

#1: Every Song a Blob of Sound

Why did I choose this one to be number 1? Your sound tech paid me – he’s tired of trying to create music out of mush.

(OK, he didn’t, but had he known…)

I chose this one first because it gives us a chance to talk about some fundamentals of playing as a band. Plus, many of the other sins are closely related to this one.

11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 2

#2: Failing to Create Space

Do you have people on your team who play every note of every chord of every measure of every section of every song? Every Sunday. The “demon” behind this “sin” goes by the name of Overplay. He’s done quite well at infiltrating most worship teams.

#3: Not Playing as a Team

This is also known as the “Six People Playing the Same Song on the Same Stage in the Same Key and Nearly the Same Time” sin. As a moniker, it’s a little cumbersome, but it is pretty descriptive of lots of teams you and I have played on, eh?

11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 3

#4: Playing the Chart, Not the Song

Too often, the band simply plays/sings what’s on the chart. When the offending team member listens to the mp3 at all, it’s usually just to “see how the song goes.” That’s code for I don’t really want to spend time learning my part.”

11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 4

#5: Set It and Forget It – Failing to Use Dynamics

Dynamics matter. Like the arch in a great story, dynamics allow us to build up, create tension, climax, then resolve. This helps move the worshippers along in the song. It also gives them a needed break from a constant wall of sound. Here are four reasons teams fail to use dynamics.

#6: Achieving Big with Fast

With this sin, the band doesn’t fail to use dynamics, but they manufacture them the wrong way. We use “fast” to achieve “big.”

11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 5

#7: Practicing at Rehearsals

If you fail to practice your stuff and then come to rehearsal expecting to learn it, you’ll now be taking from my time and the rest of the team’s time. Practice is personal. Rehearsal is relational.

#8: Pulling From a Stale Bag of Tricks

One of the biggest kicks in the pants for me as a lead guitar player was having some young students on the youth team just explode in their ability on guitar. They’d come in having learned new riffs and lead parts to songs that put my “old standbys” to shame. It motivated me to sharpen the tools in my box.

11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 6

#9: Fright Reading

Fright reading is also a condition known as head-in-the-stand disease. So many worship musicians have their eyes Gorilla-Glued to their music stand that I have to wonder if God isn’t sitting on the edge of their scratched-up Manhasset. That could be the only reason to stare so intently at the thing.

11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 7

#10: More Me

This is the deadly sin leading to the volume wars between stage amps and wedges. It leaves the sound guy trying to get a mix of the house while the mud of the stage volume pours into the congregation.

11 Deadly Sins of the Worship Team, Part 8

#11: Segue?! What’s a Segue?

The band is rocking. The vocalists are singing their lungs out. The congregation is beginning to engage in worship. We are moving forward.

Then, like a Hyundai driving into the side of a Dollar General store, all forward momentum stops.

More in the series coming soon...